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foundation and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kay. armed with new job numbers and old attack lines, the two candidates for president begin their final pitches. the new york marathon cancelled amid suffering after sandy. residents of staten island say they've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on t
"exit". also, luciana souza is here. we are glad you have joined us. coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sara lawrence-lightfoot is a renowned harvard professor and author. her latest bdisalle cdle "exit: the endings that set us free." good to have the on this program. >> it is great to be here. thank you, tavis. tavis: tell me more about your fascination with endings. >> i have noticed for a very long time, from when i was very young, how we did about x's, departures, bias, in our schools, our neighborhoods, that we are so preoccupied with beginnings, with launchings, was tilting toward the future and seizing opportunities that we neglect the important
: and picture this: the u.s. is just a few years away from being the world's top oil producer, and self-sufficient. we'll tell you who's making that prediction, and investment strategies for your portfolio. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s.'s top-notch credit rating is at risk. that's the warning today from moody's investor's service. the ratings agency told u.s. lawmakers that when it comes to the fiscal cliff, the time to act is now, not next year. moody's said if action on averting the cliff is delayed until 2013, it might downgrade the stellar credit rating on u.s. debt. t ghmoriw s noy'a odhas ti right now moody's has a negative outlook on the u.s. economy. worries about a fiscal freefall, kept wall street stocks in check: the dow and nasdaq fell a fraction, while the s&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fiscal showdown in washington, but also about corporate earnings. nearly all of the s&p 500 firms have reported numbers, and profit growth is the slowest since the recession in 2009. and the majority of firms are al
book is called forget about today. we are glad you joined us for a look health care and the influence of bob dylan coming up now. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment happens in neighborhoods. learn now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. eric topol has shared the department of the cleveland clinic. he has directed the transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me examples. >> l
petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of the way first. i want to go straight to your b
spill in u.s. history. in its guilty plea, b.p. said it deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that r'sb.tetu cp.f ul b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged with 23 counts of manslaughter. another b.p. executive was charged with lying to congress. b.p. will also pay a record- setting $4 billion in criminal fines and penalties. thrown in with the criminal charges is a civil settlement with the securities and exchange commission. b.p. will pay more than half a billion dollar
bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." sandy has gone. new york tries to get back to life. >> this is crazy. it has taken me 45 minutes just to get right there from third street. i have never seen traffic like this in my life. >> on the campaign trail, though, it with five days ago, the campaign -- the campaigners are covering the country in search of every vote. and new wealth is opening a great divide for the next generation of leaders. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. three days after super storm sandy hit the eastern united states, the death toll has climbed to more than 80. 4 million homes and businesses are still without power. slowly, though, new york is trying to come back to life. some subways are
to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the do
has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the first time, near jerusalem
further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general and two women who soon found themselves at the heart of american power. the lid came off the scandal last friday w
our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage andllt measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. w major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes i
to have you with us. a week after the presidential election, the u.s. catholic bishops vowed to remain active on several hot-button issues, including gay marriage, which, despite the bishops' opposition, was legalized by voters in three states. at their annual fall meeting in baltimore, the bishops also voted down a statement on poverty and the economy. those opposed argued it was not strong enough and failed to significantly highlight church teachings on social justice. meanwhile, the bishops voted unanimously to push for sainthood for dorothy day, co-founder of the catholic worker movement. day died in 1980. she spearheaded a nationwide effort to help the poor and homeless. >>> according to new figures from the census bureau, more than 49 million americans, close to one in six, lived in poverty last year. that number reflects a new approach to calculating poverty that takes into account money spent on healthcare, childcare and other living expenses. it also factors in government aid such as food stamps and tax credits. the new model does not replace the government's traditional way o
a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --delugedthe u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. the assaults underlines the rising tension. >> tonight, sirens sounding across tel aviv. the commercial capital and most populous city now a target for the rockets being fired by militants -- militants in gaza. people to cover bread they could. there were no casualties -- people took cover where they could. there were no casualties. >> i saw a flash of light. 2 kilometers in the direction of the seat. the rocket landed in the seat. >> targeting tel aviv marks a significant escalation of this growing conflict. the body of the man held responsible by his it -- by israel for launching hundreds of rockets from gauze that. -- gaza. at his funeral in gaza city, the military commander was carried to the streets by a noi
talked to jimmy page about their special honor in the u.s. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we begin with dramatic developments in the middle east. palestinian militants have fired a rocket all the way to jerusalem for the first time in decades. they have also targeted tel aviv. israel has risen but by calling up reserve troops and stepping up its bombardment of gaza. in a moment, a report from the gaza strip were there more civilian casualties today. first, we have this report from tel aviv. >> today, and the heart of israel, sirens scream for people to take cover from rocket fire. the past 24 hours have come as quite a shock. even for the million israelis living close to gaza, fear is part of their daily lives, the mortar and rocket fire have increased dramatically. one young couple went out to look at the rocket damage to their house and the warning of another attack sent them running. fire also interrupted a funeral of one of three israelis killed yesterday. premature babies had to be moved elsewhere. israelis are nervous. tele
the cliff, it can be very bad for markets. >> what about the u.s. economy? dodge the congressional budgetary office says that if we go over in its entirety, $600 billion worth of tax increases and spending cuts, there is no doubt we will go into recession. if it is half a year or the entire year, it will depend on the rest of the world. europe is still in trouble, and emerging markets are slowing and that makes it all the more important washington get their act together. >> can the president pull anything out of the hat? >> he needs to pull something surprising. one of the things in the run-up to the election that was a case to be made for governor romney, investors thought he might be able to shop congress, surprised the situation back into alignment. the president has to bring both sides together and have talked going to an off site meeting somewhere and having a more bipartisan cabinet collected in order to bring unity. but he has to do something surprising. >> this is a self-inflicted wound, isn't it? >> absolutely. the compromises that we made to raise the debt ceiling over a year ago,
criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brow that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supportin
historical perspective on this year's race. give we are glad you joined us. a conversation with oliver stone and peter kuznick coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion nú botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely b
are reporting from washington. one day to go, three states to visit. president obama uses the final hours to campaign for every vote he can. >> after all we've been through together, we can't give up now. because we've got more change to do. >> his rival, mitt romney, traveled to four states to make his final pitch for a change in the white house. >> you hoped that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problem. he hasn't. i will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
corporations and the richest two percent. >> what's at stake is the future of america. >> it costs us, and taxes us, too much. >> american future fund is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> ryssdal: i knew right away this wasn't going to be the usual story on campaign finance. one of the first surprises was finding myself driving the dark streets of denver with attorney alan schwartz, who shared kind of a strange experience. >> it was early january of 2011, and my wife, who had just been reelected to the colorado state senate, got an e-mail from someone who claimed to have some information about a group that had sent out some attack ads against my wife. >> ryssdal: the guy said he had some documents, and a week later... >> i heard from this individual again. still not identifying himself, but telling me that if i wanted to see the documents, then i needed to get them that day. >> ryssdal: had to be that day. >> had to be that day. >> ryssdal: schwartz agreed to meet the guy who said the documents were stashed in a safe house that he would take him to. >> i didn't know
-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about w we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-time author and iraq war veteran kevin powers about his novel, "the yellow birds." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 peo
. it's at war with us." >> and-- >> there's something fundamentally flawed about a system where in order to get elected the members of congress have to rely on the very people who are lobbying them day in and day out. because that's their principal source of funding, those lobbyists and the interests they represent. >> funding is provided by: carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh
this program on dvd, visit shoppbs.org or call us at 1-800-play-pbs. ♪ captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org we are pbs. man: we will see why tornadoes form. man: my first reaction when i saw this mummy was, "oh, my god, it's a pharaoh." man: it is the key to curing disease. man: well, that's history right there. >> rose: welcome to the program. tonight we rebroadcast a program that was presented on election night but because of the lateness of the hour many people didn't see it. it is about america's future, not with standing who the president is. joining me are tom brocaw, ally gutmann, david brooks and jon meacham. >> they have to taker it out of column a and say some seizure are right and some of the issues on education and inequity are right and i'm going to take it out of both sides and that will just confuse everybody. but more people in the country between the tweeting and blogging would say interesting. >> rose: america and its future, the america moment when we continue. fv captioning sponsored by rose communications >> right here at home. >> that future is out th
at home! >> that future is out there! it is waiting for us! >> tonight, a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next generation so says james free man clarke. while all the world focuses on the election results, e we want to raise this question: where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth, and where is it going? the challenge for the next administration are both immediate and deep. no great country has sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with the fiscal cliff, partisan gridlock has prevented us from making the hard decisions about where we need to spend and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequality. while we remain the richest country in the world, the global economic order is rebalancing. the application of american power is changing as we have seen in the response to the arab spring. old alliances need redefining. the pivot to the east demands understanding between china and the united states and the realization that it is
consensus to do the peoples business. and what folks are looking for-- and i think all of us agree on this-- is action. >> reporter: speaker pelosi suggested the leaders agree on milestones that will bolster the economy. >> we should have a goal in terms of how much deficit reduction. we should have a deadline before christmas. we should show some milestones of success so that confidence can build as we reach our solution. >> reporter: over the last week markets had grown increasingly pessimistic about avoiding the fiscal cliff. today's tone provided some relief, but it's clear major hurdles remain. >> how much do rates have to go up? what can republicans accept on that and what can the democrats accept in terms of structural reform of entitlements? i think those are the two big sticking points and those are going to remain the sticking points. and if you can figure out what's going to happen there, you can figure out whether there is going to be a deal and when that deal might happen. >> serious negotiating begins after thanksgiving. susie. >> susie: you know, darren, you talked about the
there waiting for us. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with a fiscal cliff. partisan grid lock has present us from making hard decisions about where we need to stand and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequity. while we remain the richest country of the world the economic order is rebalancing. economic powers are changing as we've seen to the response of the arab spring. defining east, demands between china and the united states and the realization it is not a zero sum game. there are problems that transcend are lationships, climate change global health and science. science and technology are giving us extraordinary insight who we are
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: general john allen, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, is under investigation for sending messages to a woman linked to the scandal that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, spst giepma r oadtsinorchn sa' magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and citdwellers eat
heroes because they stood up and said, "you are not going to take the vote away from us." some people stood in line for six, seven and eight hours. some had been in areas that had been damaged by the storm. and i just think that they were there upholding democracy. so that's the first thing that i remember about it. >> they were also there making delicious pecan tarts. because when i voted, the kids in the school were selling baking goods, and they were having a great time of it. what will you remember? >> oh, that's a tough one to say. i think that for a lot of conservatives and a lot of republicans this was a very disappointing election that opened a lot of folks' eyes to some of the deeper changes that have happened in the country, much more so in some respects than the 2008 election -- which i think a lot of folks wrote off as a one off, as a fluke, something that reflected very unique historical circumstances. but i think this election really did demonstrate that there's been a dramatic change, particularly with regard to social issues and how folks talk about them. so i think th
'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. much of the east coast is still grappling with the devastation of hurricane sandy. the storm affected at least 17 states, caused massive flooding and left millions without power. religious leaders, including pope benedict xvi, prayed for the victims and for a strong recovery. and many faith-based groups quickly rallied to help those impacted by the storm. among them, the north american mission board, the relief arm of the southern baptist convention. mike ebert is the mission board's vice president for communications. he joins us from the board's headquarters in atlanta, georgia. mike, welcome. let me begin with getting -- inviting you to talk about the extent of the sbc's efforts here. how many people do you have? what are you doing? >> well, bob, we have 82,000 trained disaster relief volunteers. 1,500 disaster relief units and we will by monday be at a 400,000 meal capacity. so we'll be preparing 400,000 hot meals to be served to victims and other first responders and that will be kind of the beginning point for us. we'll
to let go now... i won't. i'd just float off, you know. i won't. come on. no use putting off the inevitable. are you going to tell her or shall i? oh, i... i think it's best coming from me. blenkinsopp! oh! oh, dear! oh, dear. bundle won't like that at all. but you're not selling chimneys? virginia: well, bundle couldn't bear to stay on, and i don't want to live here, so, what do you think? pass the whole headache on to blenkinsopp and her tea and scones. why not? will she be all right? bundle, i mean. virginia: oh, she'll foist herself onto some undeserving cause. miss marple: her father? i suppose. and you? here they come. a happy marriage. it can't be that difficult, can it? go with your heart. like mother? i keep thinking if she loved her count so much, why was she so quick to believe he'd run off? i suppose love is an act of courage. yes. miss marple. good-bye, inspector. thank you. i see now i've grown too fond of my own reputation. i was so bewitched by the blasted diamond. and now look at me. the latest of your casualties. what do you think? oh... interpol want me to
preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren
broadwell all of this access. all of us had access to general petraeus over the years when he wants us around and tell us something. but this was different. he really allowed her to go everywhere with him. he talked to her all the time. i've talked to many aides, they were concerned about it in afghanistan. they were concerned how it looked, the optics of having this woman all the time. they described her as gushy and inappropriate talking about his thoughts. you've seen her on several programs over the last week. and things she was saying about him. that made them uncomfortable. >> well like martha, i've known him for about a decade, covered him in these war jones. he's a disciplined man, a man with incredible force of will. as much as we talk about his counterinsurgency doctrine, when i think about what happened in iraq, it was really david petraeus' will power in that battle space in the way he changed people's expectations what was possible, what was striking. so to see a man of that intensity get involved with another very intense person paula broadwell, i'm surprised by the lack
degrees, that would be the way to do it. one of us suggested maybe he'd like to have a last smoke. so i got him his tobacco and his pipe, and he enjoyed that. and then he indicated that it was time. he took the gun-- he had loaded it-- and with the aid of his walker, we walked out to the garden. he chose the spot, and he decided he would lie down. so we said goodbye. and i shook his hand. i walked up the road a few hundred feet. i started to say, "god bless you," and i got "god bless" out when i heard the shot. he had put the revolver in his mouth, and it was instantly effective. and his pulse ceased soon after that. and i felt very sure that i could report that he was dead. >> narrator: john welles, a long-time friend of hunt williams, had been diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer a few months earlier. 66 years old and fiercely independent, john had always told friends that he would take his own life if he ever became incapacitated. >> to a man like john, this bear of a man who was reduced to an invalid, life didn't offer him anything after that. there are times, and certainly this
a short- run compromise that will get us past the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: the president made his suggestion for a short-term deal. he urged congress to extend tax breaks for the middle class while they work out a bigger plan for a grand bargain. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: while investors remain focused on the fiscal cliff, a further jump in consumer sentiment helped stocks close in the green today. the university of michigan reuters consumer sentiment index this month rose to 84.9. that's its highest level since july of 2007. the dow added four points, the nasdaq was up nine, the s&p 500 added two points. for the week overall, the dow fell 2.1%. the nasdaq dropped 2.6%. and the s&p 500 is 2.4% lower tonight compared to a week ago. >> reporter: while president obama and house speaker boehner both say they're open to new ideas, wall streeters remain cautious about the fiscal cliff. meridien equity partners' joe greco says the market doesn't expect it to be resolved this year. >> i think we're going to see a push pull back and forth and we're probably not going to se
and corruption against the u.s. and on the taiwan issue and against japan, so the congress has taken place against a backdrop of rising military influence. >> rose:. >> and if i could ask richard on that to me it was a sign of some kind of order in the chinese process, rather than disorder to have this clean handover, the chairman of the military commission of not having jintao hang around for a year or two, it is a modest step of transparency and institutionalization? >> i think you can definitely argue that this basically reflects well on the system, they don't have the former leading hanging on by his fingernails in another important post, that is true. but -- and that is why some people compliment jintao for respecting the process but in ordinary power politics term, it certainly shows that jintao was a much weaker leader than we thought. >> we have never seen foreign policy statements from li keqiang be, scituate. >> we don't know how assertive the military should be. >> rose: reform. >> we don't know, that's what really comes -- and you have one of the best in the world, but at the s
, in terms of how job creations in mexico benefits job creations in the u.s. because we are together producing certain goods that are going to be consumed in the region or elsewhere. the more we think about it and the more we realize that we share the possibility and the responsibility for making our region wonderful, i think the better it will be. there are any number of areas in which we can talk about specific things. >> rose: finally this. the former administrator of the drug enforcement administration have said if mexico city allows the northern states to fall under control of the cartel, quote, the united states will share a 2000 mile border with a narco state controlled by powerful transnational drug cartels that threaten the stability of central and south america. >> i think that was a risk that might have been present in the past. i think that what we have done already by bringing these cartels down and improving state catastrophe, we need to keep on going because we need to push the accelerator still. that is going to be a risk that is going to be far far away in and just
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
. in the past, military strikes have been used to send messages about the toughness of israeli leaders. >> we will take whatever action is necessary to put a stop to this. this is not merely our right. it is also our duty. >> hamas has sworn to hit back. they said the same thing during the last gossan warner -- gazan war. this showed limitations against israel's army. before the assassination, the egyptian government had been working to establish a cease- fire, and efforts have been praised by top security officials. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report
. >> have hemingway call us and apologize to us, too. >> i'm getting fit for nicky. >> patrick, she left, she's gone. >> doc, i have one instinct. i come home from work, i see my wife in the shower, i pull the car pain back -- so, yeah, i snapped. >> hey, tiffany, it's pat, you look nice. >> thank you. >> look, i think you're pretty but i'm not looking. >> neither am i. >> that's confusing, he's dead. >> wait, what's happening? 6- >> what's this i hear about you getting out of the loony bin? >> i thought you said you had it together! you were solid. >> i am solid! i was solid at the game. >> hey! >> what the hell? >> i just wanted to be friends. >> how did you lose your job >> by having sex with everybody in the office. >> serve in >> i was very depressed. >> we don't have to talk about it. how many were there? >> don't let tiffany get you in trouble. >> she's my friend. why would you say that? >> there's this dance thing. i can only do it if i have a partner. >> i'm not going to dance with you. >> is this the girl you wrote about? >> you wrote about me? >> she's my friend with an "f." >
is a big worry for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. coe os those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the
with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshoovidided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session. the president made it clear in his victory speech last night that he thinks the country wants an end to gr
. this story was still coming together and we, it didn't seem like the crime of the century to us. we thought we had a pretty good has not gull on it. >> i think there's always a benefit of doubt given to someone like general petraeus who has had an honorable career in the military for 37 years. we respect expad meyer people from the military, i'm from a military family. there are still a lot of questions out there. lots of journalists can ask and law enforcements is asking. when that statement is made and has been through all of the newspaper articles that the fbi has pretty much concluded there was no transfer of classified information from general petraeus to paula broadwell. i'm not convinced we know the full answers to that yet. why then did the fbi spend four hours at paula broadwell's home last night. point number two, how is it general pa contemporaneous and paula broadwell were able to share a private e-mail account where they saved e-mails in draft folders and the other person logged in to that same log in so they could read the same e-mails in the draft folder. it is a common techn
billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome keira knightley to this program. this friday you can catcher in the film adaptation of the classic "anna karenina." hear a sampling of her other work. >> had not your pride heard by my honesty and your scruples. do expect to rejoice in the inferiority of your circumstances? >> and those are the words of a gentleman? your arrogance and his seat, your disdain for the feelings of others made me realize i was -- you were the last man in the world i could be prevailed upon to marry. >> do you know what i am talking about? you knew before i did. >> where are you crying? >> don't you know? >> freedom and moderation. >> precisely. >> surely you are full the best intentions. i would not spend my vote on so vague a statement. one is either free or what is not. the freedom concept is an absolute. one cannot be moderately dad or moderately loved or moderately free. it must be a matter of the eithe
the election. china gets ready to take a new generation. the u.s. voters have spoken, and after a hard-fought campaign, they have reelected barack obama. right now the president and his family have returned to the white house, where they will be residents for the next four years. right now it is about watching e votes come in. mr. obama has won 303 alike toro college of votes. mr. romney had 260. for the popular vote, president obama had 50.1%. nit romney hadn't 48.3%. -- mitt romney had 48.3%. we go to chicago for the obama victory. >> this is what the three looks like, a moment of it -- what victory looks like, a moment of triumph. it is not near happiness. it is a dream and the man who embodies it. barack obama savored the moment. he became the first black american to win a second term. he basked in the pride of his wife and daughters. he said alexian's can be small and silly but this was big and important. vice whether i have earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you, and you have made me a better president. with your stories and your struggles, i ret
elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. and in that spirit, i've invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. last year, i worked with democrats and republicans to cut a trillion dollars worth of spending that we just couldn't afford. i intend to work with both parties to do more, and that includes making reforms that will bring down the cost of health care so we can strengthen programs like medicaid and medicare for the long haul. i've put forward a detailed plan that allows us to make these investments, while reducing our deficit by $4 trillion over the next decade. i want to be clear-- i'm not wedded to every detail of my plan. i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. i'm not going t
they put it together? >> they had multiple paths to get to 270. they used almost all of them. they were able to through very focused data-driven ground operation identify their voters and successfully reassemble the coalition that they had in 2008. african americans, latino, -- latinos, young voters, women. would young voters turn out in the numbers they did before? in fact, they were by one point a higher percentage than they were in 2008. would african americans vote with the same enthusiasm compared to 2008? they did. it was 15%. this was a campaign that set its sights early and improving on what everybody thought was a very good ground operation and they exceeded it. gwen: in a very specific way, not in a broad base at all and not in a way that was out to persuade anyone who had not voted for them before. >> it was not much of a persuasion. they started with the baseline of the 2008 results. and then they had the census from 2010. they saw what had changed and who had moved around. and then it's the sole reason that jim mussina moved to chicago and started building this thing. it be
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